Category Archives: UofT ?

Shit that would be socially unacceptable everywhere but Robarts

When you enter Robarts, you take a silent pact to not judge anyone for anything. No one’s there to impress anyone. No one’s trying to look cute in case they meet their soulmate — if you are, you need to give up, put on your grimiest sweater, and suffer with the rest of us. What happens in Robarts stays in Robarts.

Something magical happens to people in the stacks, and it’s kind of agreed that you aren’t responsible for what you do there because you’re not yourself (like a criminal acquitted of murder due to temporary insanity). You just ignore everyone and turn the other cheek to behaviour that would be awkward if it happened literally anywhere else.  Everyone’s in the same ‘I’m fucked’ boat and you gotta do what you gotta do to survive.

These acts include but are not limited to:

Publicly weeping

Just GET IT OUT, friend. If you haven’t seen someone crying in Robarts, you probably will if you hang out there enough during exam season. The best and worst part about crying in Robarts is its unabashedness. Unlike with other public places, no one’s trying to hide their tears (or their snot). There’s no escaping to the bathroom, because that econ isn’t going to study itself. You just let that shit out, eyes puffy, nose running, and the most you might do is stand outside in the cold for five minutes, smoke, and have a quick existential crisis before hauling ass back to floor 13. No thanks to U of T’s mental health system, ha. Aha.

Eating with no fucks given

To the sunken-eyed bitch with your feet up in the caf at 5:30 am, a can of Monster, and Cheeto crumbs all over your face: I feel you. I am you. We are all you. Everyone smuggles food into libraries, but eating in Robarts involves a new level of desperation that makes it extra messy (and unhealthy). People forget all their manners because the etiquette part of their brain is malfunctioning from the studying.

They chew with their mouths open, they wolf down junk at alarmingly fast rates, and they shove food in their faces with their whole hands. Have I whipped out a Pez dispenser, bubble tea, stale fries, and M&Ms all at once on Robarts’ tenth floor? Fuck yeah. Would I have pulled that shit at EJ Pratt? No way.

Burping and/or farting without shame

I feel like a lot of people have burped by accident in Robarts and been mortified for two seconds but then were like ‘fuck it’ because it’s Robarts. If someone’s going to judge you in a sacred place, they are not worth politeness. People definitely let one loose in the stacks too, but not many people probably notice because everyone has earbuds in. Someone actually posted a cute missed connection a while ago (I want to say it was on Reddit?) saying something along the lines of, “To the girl in Robarts who farted with her earbuds in, I love you.” That warmed my heart. Maybe true love does exist.

Exposing others to your feet

People think really hard about what to wear to be comfortable on long flights, and I see no difference between an eight-hour economy flight and an eight-hour Robarts session – except with the flight you’ve actually made progress at the end. You’re in an uncomfortable chair, quite possibly sharing cramped space with other people, with limited leg room, bad ventilation, and bacteria-infested surfaces. You have to be comfortable if that’s going to be your whole day. It’s natural people take their shoes off because how are you supposed to put your feet up on other chairs or find weird sitting positions with Docs on?

Wearing clothes that burn people’s eyes on sight

If you’re in Robarts stacks for more than three hours, there’s a 75 per cent chance you haven’t done laundry in a long time. It’s math. Maybe you try to look presentable in class, and now all your ‘respectable human’ clothes are dirty. You have to dip into your back stock. That ill-fitting Black Market purchase from two years ago? The hand-me-down jeans from your cousin that make your ass look terrible? Your ex’s threadbare H&M sweater that you found in a drawer months after you broke up? All fair game. You submitted the paper two minutes before it was due. Your gross clothes made you not naked. You both did the bare minimum. You belong together.

How to make the most of that dreaded commute to campus

I’ve had my fair share of commuting in undergrad. Half of my time spent at school was commuting approximately an hour-and-a-half to two hours to get to class. At first, I found the journey annoying at best and dreadful at worst, but over time, I somehow managed to make it work.

Everyone has their own routine and rhythm when it comes to commuting. Some people enjoy the hustle and bustle of rush hour, while others try to avoid it at all costs. Here are five tips for everyone to make the best of your daily commute:

1. Meditate – I typically try to avoid sleeping during my commute because of the fear I’ll miss my stop – it has happened before, unfortunately. The next best way to relax and let loose is mediation. If you can muster up the courage to close your eyes and breathe deeply in front of a bunch of strangers, I highly recommend meditating. You could meditate on your own or use an app that walks you through the steps. I personally use the popular app, Headspace, but there are plenty of options out there. It’s a peaceful way to start and end the day.

2. Listen to your favourite podcast – There’s not much you can do on those packed rush hour Subway cars but listen to podcasts or music. If you drive to campus, you’re in a similar boat. My advice is to reserve one of your favourite podcasts specifically for your commute, that way you have something to look forward to. For me, this pod was Song Exploder, but choose whatever suits your taste. Also, if you can afford it, noise cancelling headphones are the way to go. If not, there are plenty of cheaper alternatives that will do the trick.

3. Do your schoolwork – This one’s a little tricky for those who drive in, but us GO Train-er’s can appreciate the beauty of the quiet zone to get a little work done. I wouldn’t recommend finishing your readings if you are prone to motion sickness – I, for one, can’t read on the bus – but your commute is a great opportunity to squeeze a little work at the beginning or end of your day.

4. Socialize – This tip is great if you know someone who has a similar commute. If you have a close friend who gets off at your stop, you definitely lucked out. I’m fortunate that my parents and I share the same commute into the city so, even if we don’t always talk during the trip (again, quiet zone), it’s still nice to spend the time with them. Additionally, for one year, my partner and I were both commuting west of the city and we took the opportunity waiting for our trains to just hangout and de-stress.

5. Catch up on the latest news – During my years commuting, I spent every morning reading the Globe and Mail and skimming through my New York Times daily email newsletters. During the day, I would pick up a print copy of The Varsity and read it on my travel home. If you drive, I recommend listening to CBC Radio at 99.1 FM – Matt Galloway’s Metro Morning is the only thing I want to listen to when I’m rubbing sleep out of my eyes. For those who prefer to check the news on your phone, I would recommend get an app like Pocket which allows you to download news articles and read them from your device when you lose your internet connection.

6. Celebrate the beginning or end of the day with a nice beverage – If you know me, you’re well-aware I’m a big fan of coffee. I often grab Tim’s before my morning commute and a decaf from Union Station’s McCafé for the way home. Occasionally, I’ll grab another drink like a Booster Juice or even just fill up my water bottle. It might seem excessive, but having a drink during my trip somehow made it just the slightest bit nicer.

Campus events you shouldn’t miss out this week

Monday

Commuter Appreciation Week: Innis De-Stress Self Care Event

Let’s be honest, we could all use a little de-stressing. This week various college commuter groups have joined to host UTSG’s annual Commuter Appreciation Week. Monday’s event will feature everything self-care related from tea and snacks to bubble wrap popping.

When: 4PM—7PM

Where: Innis College Residence Events Room, UTSG

Cost: Free

Tuesday

Lecture Me! A Series: Video Games can Make You a Better Person

This UTM event is part of the Lecture Me! series and will showcase English and Drama Professor Larry Switzky. Many public discussions concerning video games centre around its potential for violence, however this lecture will emphasize its possibilities for good. The free event should make for a unique discussion.

When:  7PM – 8:30PM

Where: Experiential Education Unit, UTM

Cost: Free

Wednesday

Masquerade Ball: The Social Sciences Formal

The Ethics, Society & Law Students’ Association, Undergraduate Social Students’ Union, Peace, Conflict & Justice Society, Criminology Students’ Association, and Employment Relations Student Association have teamed up from an annual course union formal. Tickets are slightly cheaper for those in the social sciences but everyone is welcome.

When: 7PM – 11:59PM

Where: Hart House East Common Room, UTSG

Cost: $10 for social science students and $15 for non-social science students

Thursday

Netflix and Neuroscience

The Neuroscience Association for Undergraduate Students is holding a low-key movie night this Tuesday. The association says the film is TBD but will be neuroscience-related. Oh and also, there will be snacks.

When: 4PM – 6:30PM

Where: Claude T Bissell Building, Room 112, UTSG

Cost: Free

Finding a Literary Agent

Hart House’s Literary and Library Committee’s annual, “Finding a Literary Agent” event is perfect for those interested in writing and publishing. The panel will feature Toronto-based authors and agents who will share their experiences and advice for aspiring authors.

When: 6PM—9PM

Where: Hart House East Common Room, UTSG

Cost: Free

Friday

Environmental Career Day 2019

This Friday, U of T’s School of Environment is hosting a career day specifically designed for those interested in jobs involving the environment. Learn about various volunteer, internship, and employment opportunities from different organizations. All students are welcome to attend the day-long event.

When: 10AM – 3PM

Where: Hart House Great Hall, UTSG

Cost: Free for U of T students

Voicing Our Stories: International Women’s Day Variety Show

For International Women’s Day, Hart House’s Social Justice Committee, the MGA Intersectional Feminist Collective, and Hart House Global Commons will be hosting a women-filled showcase. The event will feature stand-up comedians, writers and poets, and a performance artist. You won’t want to miss this one.

When: 7PM – 9PM

Where: Hart House Debates Room, UTSG

Cost: Pay what you can

Saturday & Sunday

Indig-U-Know: UTSC’s first Indigenous Conference and Pow Wow

This weekend, UTSC will have its first Pow Wow and Indigenous Studies Conference. The Scarborough Campus Students Union has partnered with campus Elder Wendy Phillips and UTSC staff to put on the event. The weekend will begin with the conference filled with lectures, workshops, panels, and performances, and will end with a traditional Pow Wow.

When: March 9 at 10AM – March 10 at 9:30PM

Where: UTSC

Cost: Free

DIY: A student’s guide to improving your English

Growing up in Toronto provided ample opportunity to explore different cultures and learn new languages. However, it wasn’t until an experience abroad that I’d learn the art of mastering a new language. The key is to immerse yourself.

For those who, like me, came to Canada from elsewhere or for whom English isn’t a first language, studying at U of T – notorious for its isolationist reputation, jokingly, comparable only to that of Donald Trump’s USA – doesn’t mean you’re doomed to graduate with a flimsy, if not utterly deteriorating, command of the English language.

The U of T community is not isolationist – contrary to popular, albeit, false belief. The choice of isolation is left with individuals. You’re free and encouraged to use the plenitude of campus resources to improve your English.

Better English is, after all, in your hands and it’ll certainly reinvigorate your experience here at U of T; by opening new doors, you’ll begin to see the plethora of possibilities and appreciate the boundless opportunities that Toronto boasts. Improving your English is a sure way to attain a more enriching, interconnected and positive learning experience.

Here are ten tips for improving your English:

1. Change your devices into English – like your phone and computer. Language is like a muscle and with more use the stronger it’ll get.

2. Talk, listen and read in English as much as possible. Switch your social media platforms to English. Make it a rule to communicate only in English, even with fellow expats. Push yourself and others out of the comfort zone and build better English together, that’s the real meaning of socializing anyways.

3. Keep an English vocabulary journal. Make it a daily habit to learn new words by incorporating it as part of your routine.

4. Use words in a variety of contexts so as to build more versatile and robust communication skills.

5. Subscribe to an English language magazine of a personal hobby or interest. Doing so will diversify the breadth of your use and knowledge of English.

6. Except in special cases or emergencies, take on the challenge of speaking only in English for an extended period of time – like for three or six months. This will ensure you’re more fully immersed and improve your English much more quickly.

7. Go over to the Communication Café to strengthen your language abilities and build your confidence for expressing and communicating ideas orally.

8. Try the reading-eWriting program offered by FAS to better improve your reading comprehension and writing skills. They’ll even let you follow the program, if you prefer, using your own course materials.

9. You can also join the free non-credit and no-pressure mini-courses. There’s no homework, they promise!

10. Lastly, make sure to check out the English Language Learning Student Association (ELLSA). They’re an officially recognized student group who host fun social events and are always looking to help those seeking to improve their English. You can also connect with them on Facebook.

Ultimately, English, like any language, is not easy and requires steadfast commitment for its mastery. For new and native-speakers alike, language skills are always a work in-progress. Don’t let yourself get discouraged, remember, however bleak and frozen the middle of winter may seem and feel, like summer, better English will come with time.

Five types of people you’ll find in lecture  

If you’re sitting there reading this and telling yourself that you haven’t EVER encountered these types of personalities in your lectures during your time at university, then you are definitely kidding yourself. It may be a new semester, and you may have new classes, but no matter what, you will always undeniably and inevitably be blessed with the presence of the same type of lecture folk that seem to never leave your company.

Love them or hate them, you can’t really get away from them. Here’s a guide to identify these fine humans.

1. The Snack Attacker

It starts with the surprisingly loud crunch of a granola bar. Then, that turns into a candy wrapper fidgeting fiasco, and before you know it, this person has arranged a full-on buffet for themselves right there in your lecture hall. The passionate crunching, the chewing, the constant fiddling with candy bar wrappers, the opening and closing of surprisingly loud Tupperware — it doesn’t stop. And you ask yourself: is this person aware of the ASMR live podcast that they are giving? Probably not. They continue to sit there and destroy that extreme crunch apple cinnamon granola bar like their life depends on it without a care in the world.

Where can we find this person? Weirdly enough, always conveniently sat close to you maximizing the volume. As annoying as this all may feel, next time this person brings in some Popeyes chicken strips and fries, you may as well ask them to share, right?

2. The “Welcome to my Ted Talk”

A.K.A. the let-me-tell-you-my-life-story classmate. No matter what class you are in, no matter what the lecture topic is, this person will always — and I mean ALWAYS — find a way to weave in how their life story is totally relatable to the class content and therefore must be relevant. You could be sitting in a two-hour history class about Napoleon’s reign over Europe and this kid will probably find an opportunity to twist the conversation around and share with the class how he ‘totally gets it’ because it’s how he felt ‘this one time.’

Not only does this person turn the classroom into a show-and-tell experience for one, but they also derail the content for the rest of the lecture. By the time your exam comes around, you’ll find yourself gradually composing this person’s biography. And guess what? They’d probably love to read it.

3. The Debater

This person is like that one song that was sort of your jam for a while so you ended up listening to it way too much, and now every time it starts to play on shuffle you dash to switch it to something else. The only difference here? Well, it’s real life and you can’t shuffle past this person like an annoying song on your Spotify playlist.

This person will always, without a doubt, have something to say — or more likely, debate — with whatever the professor is talking about. Every lecture ends up making you feel like you’re watching the 2016 Trump and Clinton Presidential debates on repeat; you can’t help but sing to yourself ‘here we go again!’

So sit back, get comfortable, grab a soda or some popcorn, and settle down for what will feel like a long ride to the finish line — or to the end of class at least.

4. The Snoozer

Ah yes, the source of many student memes that circulate; the classic student with their head tilted back or hunched on the table where they appear to be trying to catch up on that extra hour of sleep  they lost when they woke up to scramble to class. Funny enough, this is the same person that probably stayed up all night catching up on their latest Netflix binge even though they claimed to have been studying.

However, while you’re sitting there being attentive as possible, you can’t help but envy how comfortable this person appears to be and how easily they have drifted away into a snooze. As they continue to rock their head back and forth as they drift in and out of sleep to the voice of your professor, you may think to yourself ‘why am I not falling asleep?’ Everybody’s got to do something to get through the day, even if it’s taking a wee nap, smack in the middle of all your peers. Go figure.

5. The Buzzfeed Baddie

Depending on the time of day, what class it is, or how much coffee you’ve had, this person could be you! Most likely to be located in the middle or the back of the classroom giggling and smiling at their computer screen, this person has occupied themselves with all the possible, ‘what does your coffee drink say about your love life’ quizzes to eye-catching rainbow cake baking videos you can possibly imagine. Needless to say, this person spends more time analyzing their Buzzfeed quiz results than understanding what is actually going on in class.

Now, every so often they’ll lift their head and give the occasional yes-I-am-listening head nod to try and appear as though they’ve been paying attention, but at the end of the day, this person is probably having a better time in class than you are. Some call it ‘distraction,’ but us students like to call it ‘entertainment.’

And then there’s you. You’re reading this and probably thinking to yourself how many of these characters you can — or actually have — identified so far. And if you’re having some trouble spotting them out, sit and think to yourself: which one am I?

A call to arms: student entrepreneurship

The story of the student or college dropout entrepreneur has become ubiquitous in our cultural consciousness. Whether it is through movies like The Social Network or through public figures like Kanye West, the trajectory of the college dropout entrepreneur encapsulates one theme ingrained in the moral fabric of our capitalist society: ‘work hard, and you will succeed.’

The magnitude of the stories we are exposed to daily can often make entrepreneurship seem foreign and unattainable. I highly doubt any of The Varsity’s readers would not pause and give serious thought to dropping out and working if they felt strongly compelled by an idea that seems larger than they are or perhaps ridiculously lucrative. Furthermore, the more impossible a story, the more we seem to glorify it — almost to a fault.

Even though the Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerbergs of this world are incredibly moving motivational forces, we sometimes collectively label the ‘dream chasers’ among our own generation as foolish. Zuckerberg’s story, in particular, reads almost like science fiction to me. Born to an unassuming middle-class family, Zuckerberg famously dropped out of Harvard to develop the social media giant Facebook. A decade after Facebook’s meteoric rise, Zuckerberg, born into very similar circumstances to my own, is called to the United States Congress to answer for the accused crimes of his company.

The result is a huge misunderstanding.

The weight of the celebrity of today’s entrepreneurs makes entrepreneurship seem intimidating and impossible when it’s a perfectly ordinary venture that anyone is capable of embarking upon. Entrepreneurship can be performed in degrees, at different levels, with varying levels of profitability. The overarching significance is that entrepreneurship should be viewed by students as an empowering venture. It doesn’t have to be a big idea that starts a company, generating income by expanding on your interests and hobbies is just as useful and may provide helpful lessons on self-sufficiency and the dreaded ‘real world.’

What you should be picturing centres upon taking a talent or interest and viewing it from a different perspective. As a university student in any discipline, look into perhaps tutoring some of your peers or younger students. You can find work online editing or consulting on the works of others. Music students can do the same and look to perform either at venues or busking — there are collaboration platforms like HitRecord that facilitate networking and artist collaboration.

If you think you have a big idea, U of T also has multiple incubators that offer help to prospective start-ups. There is the Creative Destruction Lab, the Department of Computer Science Innovation Lab, the Entrepreneurship Hatchery, the Health Innovation Hub, iCube, and the Impact Centre — just to name a few. These organizations operate with the goal of providing students with the means to see their entrepreneurial ventures succeed. They provide mentorship, occasional funding, workshops, networking opportunities, and other tools for students wishing to undertake an entrepreneurial venture.

Beyond U of T, the federal and provincial governments offer grants and other programs to student entrepreneurs such as the Summer Company grant program that provides funds to students managing operations of any size, whether that be mowing the neighbors’ lawns or launching tech-related start-ups.

The tools you need to explore the possibilities of entrepreneurship are at your fingertips. Don’t be afraid to reach out and use them.

Do I have to be a Trin student to…

Trinity College may seem insular and exclusive, with high barriers to entry. I’ll have you know though, you don’t actually have to be a Trin student to partake in some of the quintessentially Trin experiences. Whether you want to though, is totally up to you.

If you’ve ever wanted to ask, “do I have to be a Trin student to do this?” Here are the answers to all your pressing questions.

Can I step on the grass in the quad?

No one is allowed to step on the grass in the quad anymore. The grass has been fenced off for the season.

Can I use study rooms in Graham Library? 

Yes, and no. Study Rooms 1 and 2 can be booked by any U of T student. The exclusive study Rooms 3 and 4 can only be booked by groups with at least one Trin student or Wycliffe College student.

Can I walk around in a gown (like a pompous ass)? 

Yes. You probably know that academic gowns are steeped in tradition at Trinity College. You don’t have to spend $125 to traipse around in a Harcourts gown. You don’t even have to be a Trin student to borrow one from the College. Sign out a gown from the Porter’s Lodge – I mean, Welcome Desk – and leave your T-Card or driver’s license as collateral.

Can I dance the night away at Conversat?

Yes. Find a Trin friend to buy you a guest ticket to the 136th Conversazione: Conversin City, if there are any left.

Can I dine in Strachan Hall

Yes. Feel free to pack your lunch and eat in the Hogwarts-esque space that is Strachan Hall. You might feel a little out of place, I recommend you visit with a Trin friend or acquaintance. If you, for whatever reason, desire the dining hall food, you can pay in cash.

Oh, and make sure to sit at the right table – rules may not be enforced, but upper year tables are for upper years, and God forbid you sit at the don’s round table or the high table.

Can I submit artwork to the Trinity Art Show?

Yes. You don’t actually have to be a Trin student to have your artwork featured in the hallowed halls of the college. You don’t even have to be a current U of T student – recent alumni are invited to submit their work too. The call for submissions is on until January 31.

Can I get involved in a Trinity College Dramatic Society production?

Yes. If you look at any TCDS playbill or program, you will see names not affiliated with the College. Talent is talent, and Trin recognizes that.

Can I join a Hart House Committee

Yes. While it seems that every other Committee is chaired by a Trin student and can be disproportionately populated with Trin students, everyone can join. Hart House values diversity, including diversity of colleges, faculties and campuses. No matter where you come from, there is space for you at Hart House.

Can I get married in the Trinity College Chapel?

You don’t have to be a Trin student, alum, or affiliated in any way, to get married in the Chapel. However, booking priority  is given to Trinity College graduates and their family members.

Can I also be “the salt of the earth”?

No, not if it wasn’t instilled in you throughout the course of orientation week. Because Trin students are truly the salt of the earth. Damn the dissenters, hurrah for old Trinity!

 

Eight upcoming campus events you should definitely check out

1. UTHS Website Launch Party: The University of Toronto History Society is launching their long-anticipated website. The group’s website is a digital database of U of T’s history, curated entirely by students. The free event will also feature displays by U of T Archives and a keynote by Historian and Professor Robert Bothwell.  As an added bonus, there will also be appetizers and a cash bar.

When: Thursday, January 24 at 7pm

Where: Hart House Debates Room

2. Hug As Many Schoolmates As You Can In 3 Minutes To Spread Warmth: This event needs no explanation. And it’s something we all need, even if we won’t admit it.

When: Thursday, January 24 from 4:12pm to 4:15pm

Where: Front Campus

3. Undergraduate Research Conference: The Arts and Science Student Union is hosting their second annual Undergraduate Research Conference where students from various academic backgrounds present their research to the U of T community. The conference is all day so you can easily squeeze in a presentation or two between class. The keynote speaker this year is Political Science Professor Lynette Ong.

When: Friday, January 25 from 9am to 3pm

Where: Sidney Smith Hall

4. U of T’s Annual Snowball Fight: Cause, why not? There’s no better way to de-stress than letting loose and throwing some icy snowballs. Unsure what you’re walking into? The Varsity’s got you covered. Check out this video we made of the snowball battle last year.

When: Friday January 25 at 6pm

Where: Front Campus

5. Poker Night Social: The University of Toronto Poker Club and Innis Poker Players are hosting a relaxing evening of poker and tea this Friday.

When: Friday January 25 at 6pm

Where: Innis College Residence Events Room

6. Pathways to Sustainability Conference: This Saturday, the Sustainable Engineers Association is hosting 2019’s U of T Sustainability conference. The conference’s theme is “Pathways to Sustainability” and will explore a variety of topics related to sustainability. The event is stacked with great keynote speakers and will have food.

When: Saturday, January 26 from 8:30am to 6pm

Where: MaRS Discovery District

7. ASA Arts Night: U of T’s Afghan Students’ Association is hosting their fifth annual Arts Night on Saturday. The evening provides a platform for various forms of Afghan art. In addition to visual art, the event will also feature spoken word poetry, traditional dance, and musical performances. Last year 250 people came to the event, and this year the association is hoping to expand further. Individual tickets are $20 and, if you purchase in a group of five, each ticket is $15.

When: Saturday, January 26 at 6pm

Where: Daniels Spectrum, 585 Dundas Street East

8. Design for The Varsity: Come help design our weekly print paper! If you have used Adobe InDesign before you can sign up for a weekend production slot by emailing one of our designers at [email protected] or [email protected] If you don’t have experience — no worries! You can sign up for a training session by emailing our designers as well.

When: Saturday, January 26 between 11am and 3pm

Where: The Varsity‘s office, 21 Sussex, third floor

Breaking down U of T’s Mental Health Resources

At the University of Toronto, it may be hard to sift through the various mental health services offered across campus. Here’s a breakdown of some college, campus, and general mental health resources available for students: 

Innis College

Innis College focuses on hosting wellness events, including yoga sessions and collaborations with Hart House to offer drop in dates for board games, hot chocolate, crafts and more community activities during the month of December. Innis college also aims to raise awareness on practicing safe sex, managing stress and learning how to effectively manage your time.  

New College

New College advocates for mental health anti-stigmatism. The college participated in the Student Voice Project bringing speakers from a variety of disciplines together to talk about the importance of mental health. The college also offers many activities that encourage creativity and critical thinking when discussing matters of mental health. New College strives to create a sense of community for its students in advocating for mental health and support.

Woodsworth College

Woodsworth College strives to be a safe space for its students by providing activities and initiatives in which students can partake. Every Wednesday, the Woodsworth College Students’ Association (WCSA) offers free pancakes to all its students to encourage a sense of community. Students can also reach out to WCSA’s Mental Health Director, Amelia Eaton, at [email protected] for support. WCSA also hosts activities that help students academically such as ‘cam jam’ sessions prior to exam periods. Students are also encouraged to join the running club at Woodsworth to destress with physical activity.

Victoria College

Victoria College believes that addressing the right resources for help is crucial. The Office of the Dean of Students, Vic Information Desk, and the Office of the Registrar are all contacts that students can approach in times of need. Victoria College also hosts “Wellness Wednesdays,” a weekly program to support the mental and physical health of Vic students. Additionally, Victoria College also offers weekly mindfulness and weekly yoga sessions for its students.

St. Michael’s College

The University of St. Michael’s College (USMC) offers many different resources for students such as learning strategies, health and wellness, and a wellness counsellor, Nicole LeBlanc. Students can approach her with various mental health concerns ranging from depression, anxiety, addiction, and trauma. Her services are confidential and in compliance with the Personal Health Information Protection Act (PHIPA).

Trinity College

Trinity College strives to provide academic balance with a sense of community, relationship, and responsibility. The Health and Wellness program at Trinity aims to support student success across all disciplines with a concentration on managing food, equity and diversity, sexual violence education, prevention and support, and mental health management for dealing with stress and crisis situations.

University College

University College (UC) focuses on a systematic approach of considering the role of the university at large to create a healthier framework. UC advocates increased mental-health communication; preventive, educational, resiliency, and anti-stigma programming; supporting the mental health needs of diverse communities; expanding partnerships with off-campus health resources; and increased peer mentorship offerings. In January, Daphne Wang, along with Tisha Hasan and Lynn Ly, founded Peer2Peer at University College, which holds anonymous weekly drop-in talks led by trained peer facilitators on topics like stigma, homesickness, and post-grad angst.

UTM

University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM) offers individual mental health services. To contact the UTM Health and Counselling centre where students can interact with a personal counselor, nurse, or doctor, and book appointments students can email [email protected] or call 905-828-5255.

UTSC

University of Toronto Scarborough (UTSC) offers personal counselling and a Health and Wellness Centre for emergency or crisis situations. Students can email the Health and Wellness Centre at [email protected] or call 416-287-7065.

Other resources

Students also have access to Good 2 Talk (1-866-925-5454). This is a free service for post-secondary students in Ontario, and is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Good 2 Talk is a free, confidential helpline providing counselling and referrals.

If you or someone you know needs someone to talk to right away, you can call:

  • Canada Suicide Prevention Service phone available 24/7 at 1-833-456-4566
  • Good 2 Talk Student Helpline at 1-866-925-5454
  • Ontario Mental Health Helpline at 1-866-531-2600
  • Gerstein Centre Crisis Line at 416-929-5200
  • U of T Health & Wellness Centre at 416-978-8030

Disclosure: Amelia Eaton is a Comment columnist for The Varsity.

The four types of cute guys in tutorial

Tutorial is the holy grail place to find attractive people at school because you’re forced to sit next to them and discuss stuff. Projecting way too much onto cute boys will solve all your problems. There are only four types of cute tutorial guys, but I swear you can fit all of them into one or more of these categories if you don’t look too deeply at their souls.

The Philosophy major with a capital ‘P’

Philosophy Guy’s hair is just a bit too long, bordering on shaggy but ending up artfully tousled instead. He’s also trying to grow out some facial hair with really mixed results. Every other class, he wears a patterned short-sleeve button-down, usually with one more button than necessary undone. You talked to him once and he mentioned his psychedelic funk band within the first minute. In class, he sits at the front with his Moleskine and fountain pen and really thinks hard about what the prof says, scrawling down random things but never taking notes when actually important stuff is on the slides. He wears scuffed Converse, or maybe Vans. If they’re absolutely falling apart, you know he’s actually a Philosophy specialist.

The human red flag

Red Flag is almost always late to tutorial. There’s only a 50 per cent chance he’ll even show up, but when he does, you melt a bit despite everything about him screaming ‘run far, far away’: his Supreme laptop sticker, his Chance hat with the ‘3’ on it, his white sneakers that are so white it’s actually suspicious. He leans back in his chair a lot in class and manspreads on occasion. The fuckboy vibes are strong with this one, but you can’t help it. Maybe it’s his messy (the hot kind of messy) hair. Maybe it’s his disturbingly large collection of nice hoodies that you can imagine yourself wearing. I’m sorry, but this is your life now. Seek help.

The walking J.Crew ad

This guy is like if you took an ad for J.Crew and then added even more hair pomade. If U of T had a rowing team for rich kids (dragon boating doesn’t count), he’d be on it. He might own more than one peacoat, and he’s generally well-groomed but still misses some stubble here or there. He’s a little bit too good with people and talks a lot, to the point where it’s truly shocking when the TA asks a question and he doesn’t immediately offer some crazy articulate answer. When other people answer a question or respond to what he says, he nods his head thoughtfully. He sticks mainly to button-ups and nice sweaters, but every now and then he breaks out that rowing blazer with confidence you wish you had. You really want to hate him but just can’t.

The quiet guy in the corner, but ohmygod his eYeS

Quiet Guy is really unassuming-looking in basically every way. He always goes straight for the back of the room and then just looks intensely at every person who speaks. He isn’t trying to stare or anything; his eyes are just that piercing. You can rarely find him in class because he sits by himself and blends into the crowd. When you speak up in tutorial, he looks at you and your actual identity shatters because he sees through everything you have ever said or done. His voice is probably super deep… but who’ll ever know?